Monthly Archives: November 2008

Big Things In Small Packages – For Meeting Planners

K Hotels LLC, a Beverly Hills, California, based boutique hotel sales and marketing company, is succeeding by doing what boutique hotels do best. That includes tailoring its experience to the small meetings market, with food and beverage leading the way.

K Hotels has been a source for “distinct, independent hotels for travel professionals and consumers” for more than 15 years. The company, relaunched in 2007 as K Hotels (formerly Kerry Hotels), provides full-service sales, marketing, and reservations services to its collection of 50 independently owned three-, four-, and five-star properties in 13 countries. Small group meetings—sales, marketing, planning, or budgeting meetings for personnel ranging from entry- to executive-level—account for about a quarter of K Hotels’ business. Why?

“First, attendees don’t get lost in the shuffle of a big hotel,” says VP John Sears. A boutique hotel, he points out, averages between 50 and 100 rooms, while the average meeting includes 26 people. “Twenty-six people can get lost in a 500-room hotel with thousands of square feet of meeting space and multiple meetings going on,” Sears says. Generally, a boutique hotel has only one or two meetings occurring at a given time. “It’s more of a private club setting.”

Get the complete story at Hotel F&B Magazine

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Five Ways Meeting Planners Can Avoid Germs While Traveling

A busy meeting planner can’t afford the time to be slowed by a cold or any other contagious illness while traveling to and from meetings, conferences, and events.

“The risk of contracting a contagious illness is heightened when we travel within any enclosed space, especially during the winter months, when most of the respiratory viruses thrive,” said Dr. Mark Gendreau, a senior staff physician at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, MA.

Get the full story from CNN.com/health

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Hotels In Houston See Increases While Hotels In Boston Take A Hit

Houston, New Orleans, and San Francisco lead the way posting the strongest year-over-year hotel occupancy and room revenue increases so far this year, while markets including Phoenix, Boston, Nashville and Virginia’s Norfolk-Virginia Beach area have taken the biggest hits.

Smith Travel Research reported occupancy rising in New Orleans by 11.2 percent, and in both Houston and San Francisco by 1.3 percent, the only three of the top 25 lodging markets in the United States to post annual year-to-date occupancy increases by the end of October, compared with the same period last year. The three cities also had the largest year-over-year increases in revenue per available room for the first 10 months of 2008, with New Orleans up 13.2 percent, Houston up 11.2 percent and San Francisco up 7.8 percent.

“Houston continues to outperform the rest of the top 25 because of the displacement of Hurricane Ike and the relative strength of the oil industry,” Smith Travel Research vice president of global development Jan Freitag said in a statement. “New Orleans appears to have gotten back on the schedule for larger groups, as its RevPAR and occupancy indicates.”

Meanwhile, both Phoenix and the Norfolk-Virginia Beach market experienced considerable drops in RevPAR and occupancy. In Phoenix, occupancy dropped by 10.2 percent and RevPAR dropped by 6.2 percent. In Norfolk-Virginia Beach, occupancy dropped by 8.9 percent and RevPAR dropped by 7.9 percent.

Boston also had a 4.6 percent decrease in RevPAR, while occupancy decreased 7.1 percent in Nashville.

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Meeting Planners Who Add Vacation Time To Client's Event

Meeting planners who manage their client’s onsite meetings typically work 12 to 16 hour days.  The responsibility of managing a meeting can take their toll and when the program is over its time to head home or extend “post” for a little R & R.

“If you’ve got to be there for work anyway, why not stay a couple of days and unwind?”  That seems to be the sentiment of a growing number of meeting planners who are extending their stay to squeeze in some vacation time.

Do you feel that it’s OK to extend your trip, even if your plane ticket is already paid for and your room is discounted at the group rate?  Do you invite your spouse, family or friends to join you to at the end of the event?

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Meeting Planners Who Add Vacation Time To Client’s Event

Meeting planners who manage their client’s onsite meetings typically work 12 to 16 hour days.  The responsibility of managing a meeting can take their toll and when the program is over its time to head home or extend “post” for a little R & R.

“If you’ve got to be there for work anyway, why not stay a couple of days and unwind?”  That seems to be the sentiment of a growing number of meeting planners who are extending their stay to squeeze in some vacation time.

Do you feel that it’s OK to extend your trip, even if your plane ticket is already paid for and your room is discounted at the group rate?  Do you invite your spouse, family or friends to join you to at the end of the event?

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What Short & Long-Term Trends Are You Seeing In A Tough Economy

In your attempt to place short or long-term meetings and events around the country are you seeing any interesting indicators or trends from hotels?

Hotels appear to be more flexible with short-term business in the areas of concessions but seem to be holding steady to keep their rate integrity in check and not wavering much from meeting room rental fees for long-term business.

What indicators or trends are you seeing?

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Filed under meeting planner, event planner

What Short & Long-Term Trends Are You Seeing In A Tough Economy

In your attempt to place short or long-term meetings and events around the country are you seeing any interesting indicators or trends from hotels?

Hotels appear to be more flexible with short-term business in the areas of concessions but seem to be holding steady to keep their rate integrity in check and not wavering much from meeting room rental fees for long-term business.

What indicators or trends are you seeing?

Leave a comment

Filed under meeting planner, event planner